Monday, January 16, 2006

Grandma's House

This is My Husbands Grandmother.
























Sadly, she passed away over two years ago. Ruby was the matriarch of this family. Her four children, senior citizens themselves, always held her in the highest regard. She was a woman of substance. Very strong, intelligent and well versed. Well into her eighties, she was an indominatable character. She held her views on politics, and had a sharp tongue for the doings of some of our leaders. Very involved in her church, Ruby was well known in the local church as a woman of great faith and contribution. She out-lived her husband for almost a quarter of a century. Yet she always spoke of him with endearment and an unfading fondness.

I know how difficult it is to lose such a dear one. But is that loss felt more keenly by having had that person in our lives for so very long? Her children were so fortunate to have their mother involved in their lives for so many years. I think loosing your Mom when you are in your 60's must be so very hard.
Do we really truly leave the nest while our Mother remains a big part of our lives? Is it that much harder to let go and to continue along the road of life without her presence? Becoming an orphan as a senior citizen must be that much harder than as a middle aged person, I think.





This is grandma's House. It has finally been sold. Her kids spent the past two years, sorting through a lifetimes collection of momentos. Then fixing the place up for market. They put a lot of work and time into getting it ready to sell. A labour of love. They say, to let the place go into someone else's hands with pride and dignity. I believe, the time spent there, painting and sprucing, was their way of learning to let go. A therapeutic endeavor.

This place will always be held in the hearts of the family as a hub for all we hold dear. Whenever we drive by it, we will always be reminded of the love that resided there. It was a place where we could drop in unexpectedly at any time and be welcomed with a warm embrace. A place where it would be insisted on sitting down to a meal. Where opinions could be discussed and where a pride in the family was cultivated.


Dignity, cheer and caring. Love, respect and values are all things that we take with us and share with others as we go through life. But these things were such a part of this house, I believe that they will have soaked into the framework of the home.

My prayer for its new occupants is this.

May the love this structure has housed throughout the years become a part of your lives. Blessed be those who take shelter under its roof and may the warmth emanating from its beams reach into your hearts.

14 comments:

Walker said...

Exellent post.
Its to bad that the house couldn't stay in the family.
I have found people who were born around at the turn of the century had a undaunting character.
Strong willed.
Survivers.
She remi9nded me of my grand parents. Even though they were from a different country they were outspoken and brave.

David said...

A tough time indeed and a sad event to work through. But what fond memories you all have of a beautiful life. I hope that provides comfort.

LZ Blogger said...

I hope that someday my grandkids will handle my passing with as much dignity as your husband's family seems to have handled his grandmother's! Nice POST! ~ jb///

Fred said...

It didn't have to be a biggest house on the block to hold more memories than any other. Nice tribute, it reminded me very much of my grandmother.

ddddddddddddddddddddd said...

I never had that luxury of having a grandparent like that. My maternal grandmother died when I was six, my mother didn't get along with my paternal grandparents, the only one we had was Grampa Joe. He held it all together until about a year before he died. I miss him a lot because he was the one who loved all of us no matter what.

Great post, brought back great memories.

carol said...

I miss grandma sha........ she was a really nice lady. she seemed so English in a way, even though she wasn't. She was just such a nice, kind little woman.I hope to be like her when I am older, loved so much and missed so much.

RD said...

Simply wonderful. What a great compliment to them, and a reflection the strength of you and your family. Good people abound.

Penny said...

I don't think we ever leave our mother's nest ... and certainly never lose the memories that a home creates over the years. It's sad to see it go but you put it beautifully. Hopefully, the new family will create as many loving memories as you have.

Thanks for stopping by my site and for the great comment!

Dick said...

My Mother died in 2000, when I was 56. I think that we all kind of thought she would last forever, or at least didn't really think about her passing. I had her for over 56 years and that was wonderful. I had my Annie for over 38 years and sure wish it had been longer. Her death hit me a lot harder than Mom's, partly because Annie's was not in the right "time." She was too young. She was also the "one" I planned to spend the rest of my life with. The death of a child would be hard but I don't think anything hits as hard as loosing a loving spouse.

Be sure to talk with those senior citizens while they are still living. You may not now have an interest in learning more about where you came from & how they lived their lives but you probably will when you get older. Then it may be too late to ask them.

No_Newz said...

Beautiful words!
Lois Lane

Monica said...

I love having my mom around. I miss my stepdad who died when I was 23. But my sister was seven months old and never got to know him. I feel so bad about that. My oldest remembers his beloved Paw-Pa but my younger two never got to meet him. Sometimes I do think the ones with the longest time with them miss them, not so much more but differently.

FTS said...

What a wonderful tribute. Well done.

John said...

A most beauiful post. The picture is stunning...

deni said...

That was a beautiful post for someone who was apparently loved so well.